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Which plants are poisonous to cats

Rote Kurzhaar-Katze in hochgewachsener Kräuterwiese

It is important to know what plants are poisonous to cats in order to provide them with a cosy and safe home. In our article, we have listed in detail which plants in the home can be dangerous for house pets and which are harmless. You can download these lists at the end of the article.

 

There are many plants that are safe for kitties and some that are a real joy for cats. You might think that Mother Nature has arranged it so that animals automatically recognise which plants are poisonous for cats and which are not. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. It is safer not to rely on your pet knowing what is good or bad for them. Only put up cat-safe greenery decorations. Outdoor cats are better at recognising plant dangers, but here too, safety first!

 

These are toxic plants for cats:

There are a large number of poisonous houseplants. To keep our kitten safe, it is worth going through all the plants and sorting out those that are poisonous to our tiger. You can give them to your parents or friends the next time you visit, provided they don’t have any four-legged friends. There are different opinions about orchids. As there is an incredible variety of orchids, they have not yet been reliably analysed. We do not recommend orchids as houseplants in a cat household.

Which cut flowers are poisonous for my cat?

In principle, all cut flowers, unless they come from your own garden, are not good for our velvet paws. Cut flowers are usually heavily sprayed with pesticides and, even if they are not dangerous themselves, they are secondarily poisonous for the house cat. The most dangerous cut flower is the lily. Everything about it is poisonous, even the pollen. Tulips can cause stomach and intestinal irritation and trigger stomach cramps. The daffodil (yellow narcissus) is a popular herald of spring. Like the snowdrop, this cut flower also triggers convulsions, cardiac arrhythmia and colic in our cats. Make absolutely sure that your house cat cannot drink water from the vases. This is also poisonous in most cases.

 

How do I recognise whether my cat has been poisoned?

If these typical symptoms occur in your pet, it is very important to react quickly and consult a vet immediately. In the worst case, poisoning with plants can be fatal.

 

The symptoms of plant poisoning are

  • Diarrhoea and/or vomiting
  • Breathing problems
  • Cramps and colic
  • signs of paralysis
  • Difficulties in coordination
  • extreme salivation
  • increasing weakness

 

Which plants are suitable for my pet tiger?

There are a variety of suitable and non-toxic plants for cats for the garden, balcony and indoor areas. Please look out for toxic fertilisers and ask whether the plants have been treated with chemicals when you buy them.

 

Healthy nibbling fun for cats

The easiest way is to buy ready-grown cat grass from a pet shop or DIY store. Please make sure that it has not been fertilised or treated with pesticides. You can also simply buy wheat, barley and/or oat seed from an organic market. In a sheltered, bright and warm place, you can let the seeds sprout with a little soil and water. This way you have grown a healthy snack for your cat yourself.

A great overview of suitable and unsuitable plants can be found at www.botanikus.de

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Which plants are poisonous to dogs

puppy with lily of the valley - pet.interiors

Puppies explore their environment with their mouths and are particularly prone to chewing a plant that is poisonous to them.

Many dog owners are not aware of how many plants in our immediate vicinity are poisonous to dogs. A large number of plants in our living space, in the garden and in the wild pose a medium to high risk of poisoning for our pets. The health risk can be very high, especially for puppies who explore their environment with their mouths and teeth. With our article we will inform you about plants that are poisonous to dogs, the most common symptoms of poisoning and emergency measures in the event of plant poisoning.

 

How can dogs ingest poisonous plants?

  • the dog chews up a poisonous plant (flowers, stem and/or root) and absorbs the poison through the oral mucosa
  • the dog swallows poisonous plant parts
  • the dog has skin contact with the plant poison, e.g. the contact poison of the meadow hogweed, aconite
  • the dog inhales poisonous pollen, which is rare

 

Information for puppy owners

When a puppy moves in, all plants must be scrutinised. Due to their curiosity and tendency to explore new things with their mouths, all houseplants within reach of the young dog must be checked for their safety. Please do not take any risks and remove all plants that are poisonous to dogs from your living area.

You can find out how to stop your puppy from chewing on objects here.

 

Plants poisonous to dogs

We have compiled a list of plants that are poisonous to dogs. The list includes house and garden plants that are poisonous to your four-legged friend. We cannot guarantee that the list is complete. In particular, new varieties are constantly coming onto the market that may be poisonous to your pet. If you are unsure whether a plant is poisonous to dogs or not, it is better to remove it and not take any risks.

Download list of poisonous plants

 

A note on mushrooms

The effect of mushrooms on dogs has not yet been sufficiently researched and is therefore generally not permitted for dogs. What is considered digestible for humans is not necessarily true for dogs. This is shown by the example of chocolate. The active ingredient theobromine contained in chocolate can cause severe poisoning in dogs. As a precaution, remove all mushrooms from your garden.

 

The dog has poisoned itself

If you see your dog chewing on a poisonous plant, take it away immediately. Offer him a better alternative, a treat, sausage or, if necessary, a steak to swap the “prey”. Telephone your vet immediately to discuss whether you can take emergency measures, such as giving him charcoal tablets. Take the remaining plant parts with you to the vet. They will help you to identify the poison and the countermeasures to be taken immediately.

 

Symptoms of plant poisoning

  • Apathy shortness of breath
  • Severe and/or bloody diarrhoea
  • Blood in the urine
  • vomiting with or without blood
  • profuse salivation
  • cramps
  • tremors
  • coordination problems, staggering, falling down
  • Pale or blue discoloured oral mucosa
  • Palpitations, cardiac arrhythmia, increased heart rate
  • Shock symptoms
  • Fainting

 

Transport to the veterinarian

Contact the vet first. Make sure that the practice is open. If your dog is able to walk itself, you should leave it alone. If the effects of the toxins weaken the dog’s circulation and cause the body temperature to drop, keep the animal warm with a blanket. If your dog has convulsions, you must transport it in such a way that it cannot injure itself. If you have no means of transport to the vet and the dog is in danger of dying, call the fire brigade (emergency number 112) and ask for help.

 

Important information for the vet

The vet needs to know which poisonous plant your dog has ingested. Bring a sample of the poisonous plant with you, if available. It is also important to know when the plant was ingested. What symptoms and behavioural abnormalities does your dog show and how much of the poisonous plant did your dog ingest?

 

Switzerland, Zurich: Tox Info Suiss
Poison control centre: +41 44 25 15 151
Telephone: +41 44 25 16 666
E-mail: Info [AT] toxi [DOT] ch
Web: toxinfo.ch